Wednesday, April 27, 2011

Stormy Weather

If all the predictions are accurate, tonight's weather will give the Dunwoody tornado of 1998 a run for it's money.

For those who were around then, we remember the horrific destruction and the many many long hours of standing post. At least we were paid overtime.

Hopefully, this weather front is being over blown (pun intended) and we'll skate with a tree or two down. But just in case, pack a sandwich.

8 comments:

LoFlyer said...

It was a near miracle that we only lost one DeKalb citizen in the Dunwood tornado. DeKalb Police deserves the lions share of the credit. DeKalb does not have an effective tornado warning system.
If you saw the tornado damage path it was absolutely amazing. It looked like a 250 yard wide, 20 foot lawnmower had mowed down everything in it's path for about a mile. I remember talking to a fire Capt. about it shortly before I retired. She had been in on the call-out heading up I-285 to Dunwoody, and the conditions were just terrible. They would hit the top of a ridge or rise and stop to observe the skies for funnel clouds before continuing on. She had never seen anything like it and hopes to never see it again.
The tornado disaster recovery was the most satisfying duty I had with DeKalb government. No one was really interested in BS red-tape, but still forms had to filed and information verified so we set up a dial-up 9.6 KBs network connection with 2 old mainframe terminals and a printer at the Brookrun facility. I was on site for about a week and it was actually fun to see the employees and volunteers tackling the clean-up with vigor and determination.
This was not just an DeKalb government operation, many local jurisdictions and utilities provided badly needed assistance. I am sure they were all making over-time but damn, were we glad to see them.
Well-done to all involved.
Many thanks!
KenC

Anonymous said...

As long as the power doesn't go out along Memorial Dr again...

Anonymous said...

If you watch Glenn Burns give the weather forecast regarding the subject of threatening weather, then it means, we are all going to get seriously hurt or die tonight.

If you watch the other channels, it not going to be as bad. Yes, we will have some severe lightning, heavy rains, might have some large hail, high winds and maybe a tornado. If we map out our strategy, we will all come out of this alive and hopefully, well.

This time of year, every year, is severe weather timing. There isn't anything we can do about it except prepare for the worst and hope for the best. Listening though to Glenn Burns (with his over acting and portrayals of the beast of Mother Nature) he gets carried away often.

So bear in mind the following: Good luck, be careful and take it slow, and watch out for Glenn Burns

Barry Woodward said...

Ken, as the EMA Director for the County at the time, you guys did me a great service by all of the technology ya'll ran into Brook Run. Made my job a lot easier. There was no "let me see" or "we can't". It was asked for and done, both for employees and residents. I think it was one of DeKalb's finest hours....

Barry Woodward said...

BTW, we took a look at the siren system again in 1999 after it had been dismantled and sold to Cobb County in 1988. There were only 26 at the time of the sale, and none at the time of the storm in Dunwoody. To do it then, and remember this is always considered an "outdoor" system would be aprox 126 sirens to cover the County. Since then, that number would probably be closer to 200. Code Red is much more practical if the residents will sign up for it.

Anonymous said...

it's what this county needs......A BIG ENIMA!!!

Anonymous said...

What is "Code Red" and how do you sign up for it?

LoFlyer said...

Barry, great to hear from you!
I thought about the tornado warning system and agree the audible alarms was totally impractical except in the built up areas. It was too expensive to maintain and deploy over 274 square miles.
The US weather service came out with the current radio broadcast system, but the areas in notification alarms are way too broad. Hence I receive a warning when Macon is warned even though I live 70 miles away in Covington. Most citizens dispense with the weather-radio after three-six months of being woke up every other week in the spring and summer for warnings that apply to communities fifty miles away.
I know we can do a lot better than the current weather warning system. Do you have any ideas or contacts to discuss the issue at a federal level? My email is kencnet@hotmail.com.
I know you have some valuable insight on the problem and would love to hear your ideas.
Best of luck, mate!
KenC