Friday, April 30, 2010

Commissioners Move To Abolish DeKalb Retiree's Positions

Read the AJC story here.

21 comments:

Anonymous said...

They've said the elimination of positions will not apply to public safety.
Being on one of the current promotion lists, my question is "will Decatur allow the department to promote officers to supervisor positions left open by retirement?"
Raises have gone the way of the dinasour.....the only way to improve my lot is through promotion or leaving DKPD.

Anonymous said...

Vote them out!!!!! I'm spreading the word. A bunch of ignorant bullies. Some postions we can go without. Public Safety is NOT ONE OF THEM!!!!!!

Anonymous said...

The one thing this dept doesn't need is more supervisors...we're overloaded with them and there's a shortage of officers...just look at all the units crying for help....why in the hell do we need to pull more out of the officer pool and put in mgmt....who the hell are they going to manage.....more of the dumbass mentality that goes with this police dept...

Anonymous said...

That's a good start. Next move:
Privatize sanitation people. Talk about a big break in the budget, no more trucks, or truck maintenance, no more trash men and the private companies that the dekalb residents use will still have to pay taxes and fees to use our landfills.

Anonymous said...

DeKalb Sanitation. Enterprise Fund. Self-sustaining, primarily supported from user charges.

Anonymous said...

Management....ha what a joke!!!First of all the supervisors we do have are stupid. How about training the ones we do have!!!!! I think pushing the time from 5years to 8 years as an officer ON THE ROAD (NOT CID) MIGHT help. In the mean time stop throwing these new supervisors out there. It's not fair to the "units crying for help".

Anonymous said...

This is really off topic, but spawned by comment #6.

Its safe to say that it has gotten to the point where the supervisors, ahem sergeants, need to put themselves en route to back up on calls and stop the lazy approach of advising a radio operator to start a back-up. Sergeants, you be the back-up. Obviously, the officer is going to handle everything as the officer should anyway. The sergeant can back the officer up for the officer's safety. That's all the sergeant has to do. The only exception I see is if the sergeant is busy, legitimately busy, such as in the office doing paperwork.

Come on now. Get 'er done.

Anonymous said...

Why is it still "its who you know" in this dept. A 2800 badge number going out for a spot at the range- INSANE

Agent99 said...

"8 years as an officer ON THE ROAD (NOT CID)"

Spoken like someone who has never been in CID.

There are many paths to supervisor. And all units, even CID, have supervisors. Having a range of experience that includes both the road AND CID is incredibly valuable.

And if you think you have nothing to learn from CID, I recommend you spend a couple years in Major Felony.

Anonymous said...

HAHAHHAH - I tell you, I love these people who say "Supervisors are stupid" Maybe so but probably the same person that can't pass the CID test basic police knowledge. The same one that has taken the sergeant test 2 or 3 times. Again basic. The same person who says its fixed. I am being picked on, what have you done for me lately. We will never grow in anyway until people take responsibility for their own actions and carriers. I love my fellow officers but can we not stand on our own to feet.

Anonymous said...

Word from Decatur is that there will be no more promotions from last years roster. Auburn already starting the next promotion planning sessions.

Anonymous said...

Speaking of supervisor. Why did our Command Staff approve this 'Wednesday only' Recorder's Court date. I looked at our manpower for that Wednesday. We will have 6 officers working,while everyone else is in Recorder's Court.
Also, it amazed me in April how Tucker Evening Watch ran 8 officers on Saturdays and Sundays because they had about 6 officers assigned to TRT. Unbelievable!!

Anonymous said...

I have been a supervisor for many years. I cant understand why we transfer people to specialize units without ever speaking with the officer's immediate supervisors (Sgt, Lt) to get some real feedback on the officer's work ethics, before selecting the officer. We just select people based on what's in their 'transfer request' package, and what their buddy said about them. No cooperation in America does this except DKPD. I've seen several officers on my team get sent to CID who were at the bottom of the watch in productivity, attitude, dependability, etc. No one took the time to ask me about their performance, and I supervise them daily. This isnt fair to the officers who really deserve it. I guess doing it the right way would take away the 'buddy buddy' element.

Anonymous said...

Let me clarify comment #6

An officer who has worked the road for a year going to CID....what a joke. Then staying there for 8 years, then getting promoted to supervisor.....now that's the real joke. No supervisor skills no REAL street skill. Oh, don't get me wrong, I'm sure they have a lot of CID knowledge to bring to the table, but what the hell do they know about being the POLICE on the road. How do you manage 5 people when you have never even been an FTO or OIC. You can't!!!!!! How can you even deal with people. Get a clue!!! Obviously the person responsible for comment #9 has been in CID his entire career and probably has little or no road experience. No one is hating on you. The CID test is basic knowledge. Just because I can take the CID test and pass it, does not make me a good detective. Just because I can take the supervisor test and pass it, does not make me a good supervisor. Major felony is not the only place to get experience #9. I'm sure many officers can tell you, whenever they get a new supervisor out of CID, it's always a mess. TRAIN THESE SUPERVISORS!!!! Road experience supervisors and CID experience is great, but you have to know what you are doing first. If we are going to take these officers from CID and make them supervisors, how about making them ride with an experience supervisor before pitching them out for the kill.

Anonymous said...

To Anon 13:

Have you ever thought the reason people are chosen based on their transfer package is because a lot sergeants and lieutenants are afraid to call it like it is? How many “meets standards” and “exceeds standards” are rubber stamped up the chain?

There a lot a sergeants who don’t have the fortitude and back bone to call a slug a slug. If they don’t meet standards, then damn it, they don’t meet standards! That is how we have gotten into this position to start with, giving everybody a pass.

The majority of sergeants need to stop being “buddies” with their subordinates and act like supervisors and get in an ass when it’s needed. Yes sergeants need to respond to calls instead of simply clearing on them. That’s the only way you can judge their work quality.

It all starts with the sergeants. And if being a sergeant is too busy, stressful, and you are afraid of hurting somebody’s feelings, then turn in your chevrons and go back to writing your 2 tickets and writing 1 report in 10 hours, spending the rest of the time dodging calls just like the ones you say meets or exceeds standards.

Anonymous said...

Anon above said "There a lot a sergeants who don’t have the fortitude and back bone to call a slug a slug."

Hey...when officer OR Sergeants speak the truth, they get hammered.

Being right , ethical or professional is besides the point and not important...speaking the truth has no place in our department.

The focus is strictly on numbers. If you dodge your calls, don't cover your territory and bring in a dozen tickets each shift....while you teammates answer the calls in your territory and do all your J2, you're officer of the month material. You're gonna get promoted and pushed along because you bring in numbers.

Forget the officers who shoulder the weight to make those number possible. The officers doing the heavy lifting are seen as slugs.

Anonymous said...

I agree with Anon #13. It is a joke how we do transfers. To Anon 15, i dont think #13 is saying people who dont meet standards is being chosen to go to CID, etc.. I think the point is that we arent getting the best available because we arent getting any feedback from immediate supervisors. I know for a fact that a sgt who was recently tranferred to a specialized postion would not have gotten an endorsement from me. There are more deserving sgts.

Anonymous said...

A detective who gets promoted to sgt does bring lots of knowledge to the table. However, taking a new sgt, who's been in CID for the last several years, and throwing him on the road is a dis-service to the new sergeant and officers under his command. Make it mandatory for the new sgt to ride with a veteran sgt for about 2 weeks. Things change fast around here. Hell, we have East Precinct sgts telling officers that county policy says it's mandatory that we write a report on every 'domestic' we go to, even if there is no allegation of violence. We were told even if they are arguing over what tv show to watch we must do a report. Will someone please show me this policy!

Anonymous said...

What is stopping any supervisor attaching a memo to an officer's application package explaining the officer's work ethic and job knowledge or lack there of?? Or better yet, deny and not sign the request.

Anonymous said...

Yeah, I also heard about those East sgts telling officers to write a report on every 87. Why are we writing reports when there is no allegation of a crime? 'Officer, I just need you to standby while I pick up my child!' '431 to radio, I need a 1011 please.'

Anonymous said...

I agree that newly promoted sgts, who have been off the road for several years, need to be trained before sending them out on the road. Its not their fault, they do the best they can. As a uniform Lieutenant I can tell you that my biggest problems with paperwork, procedure, and overall supervisory skills, etc, are from newly promoted sgts who have been off the road for several years. You cant just throw them out here, and put young officers' career development in their hands, and say 'they'll learn as they go!' That is a dangerous situation.